Sting Operations Are Yet Another Reason You Shouldn't Steal People's Amazon Packages

One of the more annoying realities of ordering online is that if your package is left somewhere conspicuous before you’re able to grab it, there’s a good possibility some opportunistic bandit will nab it. This certainly goes for Amazon packages, for which reports of theft are a dime a dozen. And anyone who’s ever lost…

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Source: Gizmodo – Sting Operations Are Yet Another Reason You Shouldn’t Steal People’s Amazon Packages

Samsung teases new Notebook 9 Pen with 15-hour battery life before CES 2019

Samsung

We weren’t impressed with this year’s Notebook 9 Pen, Samsung’s attempt at a high-end ultrabook, but the company will be trying again in 2019. Samsung announced two new versions of the Notebook 9 Pen—a 13-inch and a 15-inch model—that it will show off at CES in January and release sometime in 2019. At first glance, not much seems to have changed in the new convertibles, but upon closer inspection, Samsung has made some changes that will (hopefully) make the new devices worth their inevitably high price tags.

Regardless of how you feel about the blue-and-gold color scheme on this year’s Note 9 smartphone, Samsung clearly likes it because the company brought it over to the Notebook 9 Pen. The new device has that navy blue over most of its chassis, and its edges remain the only parts where silver pokes through.

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Source: Ars Technica – Samsung teases new Notebook 9 Pen with 15-hour battery life before CES 2019

Samsung's lightweight Notebook 9 Pen is aimed at creators

Last year at CES 2018, Samsung unveiled the Note 9 Pen, a lightweight 13.3-inch convertible aimed at artists and anyone else who needed decent power with as little weight as possible. The model is back again in a big way, with an all-new design and f…

Source: Engadget – Samsung’s lightweight Notebook 9 Pen is aimed at creators

Samsung Kicks Off CES Early With a Competent But Not Terribly Exciting 2-in-1 Laptop

We’re less than a month away from the biggest tech show of the year(I can feel my heart rate rise just thinking about it), but it seems Samsung couldn’t wait until early January to announce its new Notebook 9 Pen.

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Source: Gizmodo – Samsung Kicks Off CES Early With a Competent But Not Terribly Exciting 2-in-1 Laptop

Marvel Just Revealed One of Its Most Intriguing Spider-Man Comics In Years

Spider-Man is one of the most beloved superheroes in the world for a reason—the ideals Peter Parker and the other people who’ve donned the Spider-mantle over the years have a reach that’s far and wide, and can be used to tell all kinds of different stories. But a new series out next year promises to tell one of the…

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Source: Gizmodo – Marvel Just Revealed One of Its Most Intriguing Spider-Man Comics In Years

Overwatch Map Pulled After Players Get Stuck In Spawn Rooms

Overwatch’s Blizzard World map has never been universally beloved, but shortly after Blizzard decked its halls with holiday cheer yesterday, the map apparently decided to go full Grinch. Teams found themselves beset on all sides by busted spawn rooms and glitched payloads. Now Blizzard World is shut down.

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Source: Kotaku – Overwatch Map Pulled After Players Get Stuck In Spawn Rooms

The Trollhunters Universe Expands in the First Trailer for Guillermo del Toro's Next Netflix Series

We recently ran through all the finished screenplays Guillermo del Toro has floating around his desk right now—but the wait is nearly up for the latest project from the Oscar-winning director. Animated alien tale 3Below: Tales of Arcadia hits Netflix next week, and a new trailer is here to get you excited.

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Source: io9 – The Trollhunters Universe Expands in the First Trailer for Guillermo del Toro’s Next Netflix Series

FCC Panel Wants To Tax Internet-Using Businesses, Give the Money To ISPs

The FCC’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC), which includes members like AT&T, Comcast, Google Fiber, Sprint, and other ISPs and industry representatives, is proposing a tax on websites to pay for rural broadband. Ars Technica reports: If adopted by states, the recommended tax would apply to subscription-based retail services that require Internet access, such as Netflix, and to advertising-supported services that use the Internet, such as Google and Facebook. The tax would also apply to any small- or medium-sized business that charges subscription fees for online services or uses online advertising. The tax would also apply to any provider of broadband access, such as cable or wireless operators. The collected money would go into state rural broadband deployment funds that would help bring faster Internet access to sparsely populated areas. Similar universal service fees are already assessed on landline phone service and mobile phone service nationwide. Those phone fees contribute to federal programs such as the FCC’s Connect America Fund, which pays AT&T and other carriers to deploy broadband in rural areas.

The BDAC tax proposal is part of a “State Model Code for Accelerating Broadband Infrastructure Deployment and Investment.” Once finalized by the BDAC, each state would have the option of adopting the code. An AT&T executive who is on the FCC advisory committee argued that the recommended tax should apply even more broadly, to any business that benefits financially from broadband access in any way. The committee ultimately adopted a slightly more narrow recommendation that would apply the tax to subscription services and advertising-supported services only. The BDAC model code doesn’t need approval from FCC commissioners — “it is adopted by the BDAC as a model code for the states to use, at their discretion,” Ajit Pai’s spokesperson told Ars. As for how big the proposed taxes would be, the model code says that states “shall determine the appropriate State Universal Service assessment methodology and rate consistent with federal law and FCC policy.”

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Source: Slashdot – FCC Panel Wants To Tax Internet-Using Businesses, Give the Money To ISPs

The original 'Inspector Gadget' is coming to Twitch December 17th

Inspector Gadget is back on duty. The first season of the 1983 animated series Inspector Gadget will be broadcast in its entirety on Twitch starting December 17th at 10:00 AM PST. The show will air in five-hour sessions on the Twitch Presents channel…

Source: Engadget – The original ‘Inspector Gadget’ is coming to Twitch December 17th

Valve Says Artifact Exploit Had Little Effect On The Game's Economy

The in-game economy for Valve’s new digital card game, Artifact, was upended earlier today after the company accidentally created an exploit that made it possible to buy its card packs at a heavily-discounted price. While Valve said the impact wasn’t huge, it’s led to renewed debate within the game’s community about…

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Source: Kotaku – Valve Says Artifact Exploit Had Little Effect On The Game’s Economy

Google Training Document Reveals How Temps, Vendors, and Contractors Are Treated

“An internal Google training document exposed by The Guardian reveals how the company instructs employees on how to treat temps, vendors, and contractors (TVCs),” writes Slashdot reader Garabito. “This includes: ‘not to reward certain workers with perks like T-shirts, invite them to all-hands meetings, or allow them to engage in professional development training.'” From the report: “Working with TVCs and Googlers is different,” the training documentation, titled the The ABCs of TVCs, explains. “Our policies exist because TVC working arrangements can carry significant risks.” The risks Google appears to be most concerned about include standard insider threats, like leaks of proprietary information, but also — and especially — the risk of being found to be a joint employer, a legal designation which could be exceedingly costly for Google in terms of benefits.

Google’s treatment of TVCs has come under increased scrutiny by the company’s full-time employees (FTEs) amid a nascent labor movement at the company, which has seen workers speak out about both their own working conditions and the morality of the work they perform. American companies have long turned to temps and subcontractors to plug holes and perform specialized tasks, but Google achieved a dubious distinction this year when Bloomberg reported that in early 2018, the company did not directly employ a majority of its own workforce. According to a current employee with access to the figures, of approximately 170,000 people around the world who now work at Google, 50.05% are FTEs. The rest, 49.95%, are TVCs. The report notes that “the two-tier system has complicated labor activism at Google.” On November 1st, after 20,000 workers joined a global walkout, “the company quickly gave in to one of the protesters’ demands by ending forced arbitration in cases of sexual harassment — but only for FTEs.”

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Source: Slashdot – Google Training Document Reveals How Temps, Vendors, and Contractors Are Treated

Old School Kaiju Icons Collide in This Retro Re-Imagining of the Godzilla: King of the Monsters Trailer

Few things are certain in life, but one constant is this: When there is a new trailer for Godzilla: King of the Monsters out, there will inevitably be a fan mashup that recreates it using footage from Japanese tokusatsu films.

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Source: io9 – Old School Kaiju Icons Collide in This Retro Re-Imagining of the Godzilla: King of the Monsters Trailer

Idiot Kids Will Try Anything To Get Out Of An Xbox Live Ban

Back in the earlier days of Xbox Live, while the Xbox 360 was still in its prime, the platform’s support forums used to allow users to complain about bans they’d received, and Microsoft staff would actually reply. Even if the users were being racist little shits.

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Source: Kotaku – Idiot Kids Will Try Anything To Get Out Of An Xbox Live Ban

President Trump To Use Huawei CFO As a Bargaining Chip

hackingbear shares a report from Politico, adding: “This fuels the suspicion that the Chinese executive is held as a hostage for the ongoing trade negotiation with China.” From the report: President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that he reserved the right to weigh in on the Justice Department’s case against the CFO of Huawei, if it would help him close a trade deal with Beijing or would serve other American national security interests. “If I think it’s good for what will be certainly the largest trade deal ever made — which is a very important thing — what’s good for national security — I would certainly intervene if I thought it was necessary,” Trump told Reuters. Trump added that President Xi Jinping of China had not called him about the case, but that the White House had been in touch with both the Justice Department and Chinese officials. Huawei’s CFO, Meng Wanzhou, was arrested in Canada earlier this month at the request of American authorities, who allege that she violated U.S. sanctions against Iran. Yesterday, a Vancouver judge ruled that Meng would be released on a $7.5 million bail if she remains in British Columbia.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – President Trump To Use Huawei CFO As a Bargaining Chip

How to Stop Apps from Tracking Everywhere You Go

Todd Haselton of CNBC has written a guide on how to disable location services for apps to keep them from tracking your location. His guide covers the iPhone and Android ecosystems. For example, there are options in the menus to completely disable location services or to only enable it for certain apps when they are in use.



In recent years, Apple and Google have made it easier to identify the applications that have access to your information, and to turn off the ability for those apps to see where you are. Sometimes this can stop an app from performing correctly: a mapping application would need to know your location to provide you with accurate directions somewhere, for example. But others, like weather apps, don’t necessarily need to know where you are at all times.

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Source: [H]ardOCP – How to Stop Apps from Tracking Everywhere You Go