Ubuntu 18.10 Is A Nice Upgrade For Radeon Gamers, Especially For Steam VR

Among the changes to find in Ubuntu 18.10 are the latest stable Linux kernel as well as a significant Mesa upgrade and also the latest X.Org Server. These component upgrades make for a better Linux gaming experience particularly if using a modern AMD Radeon graphics card. Here are some results as well as whether it’s worthwhile switching to Linux 4.19 and Mesa 18.3-dev currently on Ubuntu 18.10.

Source: Phoronix – Ubuntu 18.10 Is A Nice Upgrade For Radeon Gamers, Especially For Steam VR

RELPOLINES: A New Spectre V2 Approach To Lower Overhead Of Retpolines

Nadav Amit of VMware has announced their (currently experimental) work on “dynamic indirect call promotion” or what they have dubbed “RELPOLINES” — not to be confused with the traditional Retpolines for “return trampolines” as one of the Spectre Variant Two software-based mitigation approaches. Relpolines is designed to have lower overhead than Retpolines…

Source: Phoronix – RELPOLINES: A New Spectre V2 Approach To Lower Overhead Of Retpolines

Open-Source Qualcomm Graphics Support Continues Flourishing With Freedreno

When it comes to open-source ARM graphics drivers, the Raspberry Pi / VC4 effort and Freedreno continue to be the two best examples of fully open-source graphics driver coverage including 3D support. Freedreno has been attracting contributions from Qualcomm / CodeAurora in what started out as solely a community reverse-engineered effort and with the latest-generation Adreno 600 series hardware the open-source support is in great shape…

Source: Phoronix – Open-Source Qualcomm Graphics Support Continues Flourishing With Freedreno

GCC 9 Compiler Adds -std=c2x And -std=gnu2x For Future C Language Update

With GCC 9 feature development ending in a few weeks, it’s now a mad dash by developers to land their last minute additions into this annual open-source compiler update — including a look ahead for what is coming down the pipe in the compiler space…

Source: Phoronix – GCC 9 Compiler Adds -std=c2x And -std=gnu2x For Future C Language Update

Introducing the Raspberry Pi TV HAT

Today we are excited to launch a new add-on board for your Raspberry Pi: the Raspberry Pi TV HAT.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi a TV HAT with aerial lead connected Oct 2018

The TV HAT connects to the 40-pin GPIO header and to a suitable antenna, allowing your Raspberry Pi to receive DVB-T2 television broadcasts.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi Zero W with TV HAT connected Oct 2018

Watch TV with your Raspberry Pi

With the board, you can receive and view television on a Raspberry Pi, or you can use your Pi as a server to stream television over a network to other devices. The TV HAT works with all 40-pin GPIO Raspberry Pi boards when running as a server. If you want to watch TV on the Pi itself, we recommend using a Pi 2, 3, or 3B+, as you may need more processing power for this.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with TV HAT connected Oct 2018

Stream television over your network

Viewing television is not restricted to Raspberry Pi computers: with a TV HAT connected to your network, you can view streams on any network-connected device. That includes other computers, mobile phones, and tablets. You can find instructions for setting up your TV HAT in our step-by-step guide.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with TV HAT connected Oct 2018
A photograph of a Raspberry Pi a TV HAT with aerial lead connected Oct 2018
A photograph of a Raspberry Pi Zero W with TV HAT connected Oct 2018

New HAT form factor

The Raspberry Pi TV HAT follows a new form factor of HAT (Hardware Attached on Top), which we are also announcing today. The TV HAT is a half-size HAT that matches the outline of Raspberry Pi Zero boards. A new HAT spec is available now. No features have changed electrically – this is a purely mechanical change.

Raspberry Pi TV HAT mechanical drawing Oct 2018

A mechanical drawing of a Raspberry Pi TV HAT, exemplifying the spec of the new HAT form factor. Click to embiggen.

The TV HAT has three bolt holes; we omitted the fourth so that the HAT can be placed on a large-size Pi without obstructing the display connector.

The board comes with a set of mechanical spacers, a 40-way header, and an aerial adaptor.

A photograph of a Raspberry Pi TV HAT Oct 2018

Licences

Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) is a widely adopted standard for transmitting broadcast television; see countries that have adopted the DVB standard here.

Initially, we will be offering the TV HAT in Europe only. Compliance work is already underway to open other DVB-T2 regions. If you purchase a TV HAT, you must have the appropriate license or approval to receive broadcast television. You can find a list of licenses for Europe here. If in doubt, please contact your local licensing body.

The Raspberry Pi TV HAT opens up some fantastic opportunities for people looking to embed a TV receiver into their networks. Head over to the TV HAT product page to find out where to get hold of yours. We can’t wait to see what you use it for!

The post Introducing the Raspberry Pi TV HAT appeared first on Raspberry Pi.



Source: Raspberry Pi – Introducing the Raspberry Pi TV HAT

Mesa VCN JPEG Decode Patches Posted For AMD Raven Ridge

With the imminent Linux 4.19 kernel release there is VCN JPEG decode support within the AMDGPU DRM driver for use with Raven Ridge APUs. The accompanying user-space patches for the Radeon Gallium3D code have now been posted for making this functionality work on the Linux desktop with these Zen+Vega APUs…

Source: Phoronix – Mesa VCN JPEG Decode Patches Posted For AMD Raven Ridge

GCC's Test Suite To Begin Testing C++17 By Default

GCC’s test suite will soon begin testing the C++17 standard as part of its C++98/11/14 standard tests by default… This doesn’t affect the default C++ standard used by the GCC G++ compiler at this point, but at least will help eliminate any lingering C++17 bugs as well as helping to stop regressions in the future…

Source: Phoronix – GCC’s Test Suite To Begin Testing C++17 By Default

Spectre V2 "Lite" App-To-App Protection Mode Readying For The Linux Kernel

We are approaching one year since the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities shocked the industry, and while no new CPU speculative execution vulnerabilities have been made public recently, the Linux kernel developers continue improving upon the Spectre/Meltdown software-based mitigation techniques for helping to offset incurred performance costs with current generation hardware…

Source: Phoronix – Spectre V2 “Lite” App-To-App Protection Mode Readying For The Linux Kernel

Lightworks 14.5 Video Editor Released With Same-Day Linux Support But Still No Source

Lightworks, the long-standing non-linear video editing system that has offered a native Linux build the past few years after being challenged by delays for a few years, is out today with version 14.5 and comes with Linux, macOS, and Windows support…

Source: Phoronix – Lightworks 14.5 Video Editor Released With Same-Day Linux Support But Still No Source

New Details On System76's Open-Source Hardware Plans Come To Light

Longtime Ubuntu/Linux PC vendor System76 has been teasing their efforts around an “open-source computer” and other open-source hardware efforts now that they are in the home stretch of setting up their own US-based manufacturing facility. Some new details on their initial aspirations are now out there…

Source: Phoronix – New Details On System76’s Open-Source Hardware Plans Come To Light

HackSpace magazine 12: build your first rocket!

Move over, Elon Musk — there’s a new rocket maverick in town: YOU!

Rockets!

Step inside the UK rocketry scene, build and launch a rocket, design your own one, and discover the open-source rocket programmes around the world! In issue 12, we go behind the scenes at a top-secret launch site in the English Midlands to have a go at our own rocket launch, find the most welcoming bunch of people we’ve ever met, and learn about centre of gravity, centre of pressure, acceleration, thrust, and a load of other terms that make us feel like NASA scientists.

Meet the Maker: Josef Prusa

In makerception news, we meet the maker who makes makers, Josef Prusa, aka Mr 3D Printing, and we find out what’s next for his open-source hardware empire.

Open Science Hardware

There are more than seven billion people on the planet, and 90-odd percent of them are locked out of the pursuit of science. Fishing, climate change, agriculture: it all needs data, and we’re just not collecting as much as we should. Global Open Science Hardware is working to change that by using open, shared tech — read all about it in issue 12!



And there’s more…

As always, the new issue is packed with projects: make a way-home machine to let your family know exactly when you’ll walk through the front door; build an Alexa-powered wheel of fortune to remove the burden of making your own decisions; and pay homage to Indiana Jones and the chilled monkey brains in Temple of Doom with a capacitive touch haunted monkey skull (no monkeys were harmed in the making of this issue). All that, plus steampunk lighting, LEDs, drills, the world’s biggest selfie machine, and more, just for you. So go forth and make something!

Get your copy of HackSpace magazine

If you like the sound of this month’s content, you can find HackSpace magazine in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and independent newsagents in the UK from tomorrow. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble, Fry’s, or Micro Center next week. We’re also shipping to stores in Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Singapore, Belgium, and Brazil, so be sure to ask your local newsagent whether they’ll be getting HackSpace magazine. And if you’d rather try before you buy, you can always download the free PDF now.

Subscribe now

Subscribe now” may not be subtle as a marketing message, but we really think you should. You’ll get the magazine early, plus a lovely physical paper copy, which has a really good battery life.

Oh, and twelve-month print subscribers get an Adafruit Circuit Playground Express loaded with inputs and sensors and ready for your next project. Tempted?

The post HackSpace magazine 12: build your first rocket! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.



Source: Raspberry Pi – HackSpace magazine 12: build your first rocket!