A Short Documentary About 81-Year-Old Commodore Amiga Artist, Programmer Samia Halaby

erickhill shares a short documentary about Samia Halaby, an 81-year-old Commodore Amiga artist and programmer: Samia Halaby is a world renowned painter who purchased a Commodore Amiga 1000 in 1985 at the tender age of 50 years old. She taught herself the BASIC and C programming languages to create “kinetic paintings” with the Amiga and has been using the Amiga ever since. Samia has exhibited in prestigious venues such as The Guggenheim Museum, The British Museum, Lincoln Center, The Chicago Institute of Art, Arab World Institute, Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, Sakakini Art Center, and Ayyam Gallery just to name a few.

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Source: Slashdot – A Short Documentary About 81-Year-Old Commodore Amiga Artist, Programmer Samia Halaby

One thought on “A Short Documentary About 81-Year-Old Commodore Amiga Artist, Programmer Samia Halaby

  1. I have found myself in similar places regarding public release of data. I intensely dislike the practice of holding data “proprietary, as it sounds a lot like the “national security label that is too often applied. In the case of this particular study, I don”t really see the defense of the data as proprietary (there are appropriate circumstances, but they are rare in my opinion). I have toyed with the idea of declaring a personal policy that I will not work on a consulting or research project unless the sponsor agrees to make the data publicly available. Alas, it is hard to stick to such a policy when the risks are clear and the upside potential obscure. So, I understand your position, Sarah, but as I hope you realize, it is not that simple. We still need to live with ourselves. Citing the poor incentives does not excuse us from having to take responsibility for our own actions. I am not comfortable with some of the work I have done that has withheld data from public scrutiny. And, I think I should, at the very least, remain uncomfortable with that fact. On the other hand, when I have insisted that data be made publicly available, I have felt good about myself. The tension is a personal ethical choice between the incentives we live under and our own beliefs. That is as it should be but Corey”s dismissal of responsibility for people following the incentives is too easy for me. It should be harder than that.

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