A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it’s time for our annual look at how the Linux performance has evolved over the past year from graphics drivers to distributions. This year was a particularly volatile year for Linux performance due to Spectre and Meltdown mitigations, some of which have at least partially recovered thanks to continued optimizations landing in subsequent kernel releases. But on the plus side, new releases of Python, PHP, GCC 8, and other new software releases have helped out the performance. For kicking off our year-end benchmark comparisons, first up is a look at how Intel’s performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution evolved this year.

Source: Phoronix – A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

AMD Adding STIBP "Always-On Preferred Mode" To Linux

Initially during the Linux 4.20 kernel merge window with the STIBP addition for cross-hyperthread Spectre V2 mitigation it was turned on by default for all processes. But that turned out to have a sizable performance hit so the behavior was changed to only turn it on for processes under SECCOMP or when requested via the PRCTL interface. However, AMD is landing a patch that for select CPUs will have an always-on mode as evidently that’s preferred for some AMD processors…

Source: Phoronix – AMD Adding STIBP “Always-On Preferred Mode” To Linux

Qt 3D Studio 2.2 Released With New Material System, Stereoscopic Rendering Preview

Released just one week after Qt 5.12 LTS, The Qt Company on Thursday published Qt 3D Studio 2.2 as the newest version of this development environment for designing 3D user interfaces and adding 3D content to Qt5 programs…

Source: Phoronix – Qt 3D Studio 2.2 Released With New Material System, Stereoscopic Rendering Preview

Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Rolls Out While Linux Users Should Have AMDGPU-PRO 18.50

AMD today released their Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition geared for Windows gamers while Linux users should have AMDGPU-PRO 18.50 available shortly for those wanting to use this hybrid Vulkan/OpenGL driver component that does also feature the AMDGPU-Open components too in their stable but dated composition…

Source: Phoronix – Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Rolls Out While Linux Users Should Have AMDGPU-PRO 18.50

Radeon ROCm 1.9.1 vs. NVIDIA OpenCL Linux Plus RTX 2080 TensorFlow Benchmarks

Following the GeForce RTX 2080 Linux gaming benchmarks last week with now having that non-Ti variant, I carried out some fresh GPU compute benchmarks of the higher-end NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards. Here’s a look at the OpenCL performance between the competing vendors plus some fresh CUDA benchmarks as well as NVIDIA GPU Cloud TensorFlow Docker benchmarks.

Source: Phoronix – Radeon ROCm 1.9.1 vs. NVIDIA OpenCL Linux Plus RTX 2080 TensorFlow Benchmarks

Mesa 19.0 RADV Vulkan Driver Gets New Fixes To Help DXVK Gaming

Samuel Pitoiset of Valve’s Linux graphics driver team has landed some fresh patches in Mesa 19.0 (and also marked for back-porting to the stable branch) to help out the DXVK gaming experience for Windows games using Direct3D 11 that are re-mapped to run on top of the Vulkan graphics API…

Source: Phoronix – Mesa 19.0 RADV Vulkan Driver Gets New Fixes To Help DXVK Gaming

QEMU 3.1 Released For Advancing The Linux Open-Source Virtualization Stack

The QEMU emulator that is widely used by the open-source Linux virtualization stack is out with its version 3.1 feature release. This is the QEMU update that is adding multi-threaded Tiny Code Generator support, display improvements, adds the Cortex-A72 model and other ARM improvements, and various other enhancements…

Source: Phoronix – QEMU 3.1 Released For Advancing The Linux Open-Source Virtualization Stack